Software creation

Changed on 18/12/2019

In addition to fundamental science research, knowledge transfer to businesses, and start-up creation, Inria's teams are developing a host of applications, often opensource, some of which are diffused globally.

From artificial intelligence to robotics, from simulation to mathematical proofing software and from high performance computing to the Internet of Things, Inria’s software library currently contains more than 1,500 programs, some of which boast vast communities of users.

Regularly recognised internationally, the work carried out by the institute also attains a wider reach by transferring technology to companies through the creation of start-ups or industrial partnerships with major groups. In this way, innovation within Inria helps contribute towards the creation of companies, while at the same time revitalising and enhancing the sustainability of the French and European industrial base in the digital sector.

Furthermore, by encouraging software to be made available open source, Inria helps to build a technological support structure for innovative companies. Giving entrepreneurs access to cutting edge technology and skills also provides a way of boosting innovation in France.

Lastly, the substantial number of young researchers and engineers passing through the institute helps contribute to the external dissemination of the concepts, ideas and technology developed at Inria.

Programme international

Ten blockbuster Inria apps

With almost 1,500 programs, all produced by research teams, Inria's software library is a constantly evolving heritage which the institute also makes available to developers and businesses in the spirit of open science. Here is a quick tour of 10 “blockbuster” apps created at Inria.

InriaSoft - promoting the distribution of opensource software

 
Reflexion

Some software programs designed by Inria research teams and their partners lead to the set-up of consortia by InriaSoft. The aim is to develop, distribute and establish large-scale software programs, helping to create a support network for users.

Software Heritage

Logo Software Heritage

Launched in 2016, the goal of the Software Heritage project is to archive all the source code created by human beings in order to preserve it for the future. The brainchild of research scientists Roberto Di Cosmo and Stefano Zacchiroli in 2014, this project is supported by Unesco and operates thanks to partnerships with Microsoft, DANS, Société Générale, Intel Huawei, Nokia Bell Labs and the University of Bologna. By creating a universal and sustainable archive of source code, Software Heritage aims to build an essential infrastructure serving science, industry, and society.